Select Page

At the meeting, Bukele gave his testimony about the support he received from God in becoming the country’s president. He explained how the Holy Spirit revealed to some evangelical pastors before the election that he would become the President of El Salvador.

Bukele took the Assembly surrounded by soldiers and police, violating the legislative security apparatus. He sat in the chair of the Legislative Power’s president, rang the gong to open the session, remained silent, covered his face with his hands, began to pray, and invoking a divine legitimacy, said that God had spoken to him and told him to “have patience.”

Nayib Bukele has just won the presidency of the Republic of El Salvador for the second time. And he did so in fraudulent elections, as the Salvadoran Constitution prohibits re-election. Article 154 states that “the presidential term shall be five years and shall begin and end on June 1, without the person who has exercised the Presidency being able to continue in office for even a single day.” Article 248 is forceful in stating that “the articles of this Constitution relating to the form and system of government, the territory of the Republic and the alternation in the exercise of the Presidency of the Republic cannot be reformed under any circumstances.” In case there is any doubt about the non-continuity of the President, according to Article 75, “those who sign minutes, proclamations or adhesions to promote or support the re-election or continuation of the President of the Republic, or use direct means aimed at this end, shall lose their rights as citizens.” According to this article, by promoting his re-election and running for it, Bukele himself loses his citizenship rights.

In this article, I will focus on Bukele’s alliance with fundamentalist evangelical sectors, of which he is a hostage. They religiously legitimize his repressive, authoritarian and, ultimately, anti-democratic policies since he took office for the first time in 2019. In December 2018, on the eve of the closing of the electoral campaign for the presidency of the Salvadoran Republic, candidate Bukele pledged before a group of evangelical pastors to create a Secretariat of Values aligned with the moral education they taught in their churches. Upon taking office as president of the Republic on June 1, 2019, he invited Argentine evangelical pastor Dante Gebel, minister of the Assemblies of God, pastor of River Church in Anaheim (California), and singer in open stadiums where he has gathered 100,000 people, to lead a prayer.

Years before becoming president, Bukele was visited by Franklin Cerrato, evangelical pastor for the Salvadoran diaspora in the United States, with whom he has maintained a close relationship ever since. On July 23, 2019, Cerrato organized a meeting of evangelical leaders of the diaspora, the Pastors for El Salvador Movement, and the Latino Coalition for Israel with Bukele, now president of the Republic, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in San Salvador, where he introduced a Church proposal for the nation and a joint work plan for “recovering values and principles for the family.” At the meeting, Bukele gave his testimony about the support he received from God in becoming the country’s president. He explained how the Holy Spirit revealed to some evangelical pastors before the election that he would become the President of El Salvador.

God’s ‘announcement’

In 2012, he had won the mayoral election in San Salvador. His intention was to return to his businesses once he finished his term as mayor. However, his plans changed when a group of pastors from different countries visited him in his office to inform him of what God had communicated to them: that he would become the president of the Republic and then hold another position they wouldn’t reveal.

At the aforementioned meeting on July 23, Mario Bramnick, pastor and advisor to Donald Trump, whose mission was to defend Israel and convince Latin American leaders to move their embassies in Israel to Jerusalem, was also present. The pastor announced the end of captivity for El Salvador and all of Latin America and declared Bukele as the liberator of his country: “We are in a stage of fulfilling the prophecy of the 70 – he said-. The time of captivity is over; the Lord is raising up Cyrus not only in the United States but in Latin America. Bolsonaro is a Cyrus, your president Bukele is a Cyrus for this time. God is with him”[1].

Bramnick acknowledged being in a “very supernatural” time and boasted that, thanks to divine intervention and the lobbying of the White House Office of Faith, Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales had already moved his embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. Bukele’s connection with ultraconservative pastors is not limited to occasional encounters; they are relationships sustained by networks close to Bramnick, with strong political ties to right-wing governments and explicit opposition to same-sex marriage and abortion, fundamental proposals of the evangelical pastors’ moral agenda that coincide with those of the Catholic Church.

Other political figures from the Salvadoran right have reinforced the presidential trend towards fundamentalism. In November 2019, a member of the National Conciliation Party, Eileen Romero, presented a motion before the Legislative Assembly to decree mandatory Bible reading in schools. Also in November 2019, the Board of Directors of the Legislative Assembly granted a space in the official agenda for a group of ten evangelical pastors to enter and pray for the deputies so that “God may enlighten them” when legislating on the country’s major issues.

Prayers to legitimize the coup

Since his election as president of the Republic of El Salvador in June 2019, Nayib Bukele has shown numerous signs of authoritarianism and autocracy, which reached their peak with the attempted coup in February 2020. On February 9 of that year, he urgently summoned the Legislative Assembly to approve a $109 million loan for his public security plan, called Territorial Control, which had previously been challenged on constitutional grounds. This situation prompted opposition members of the Legislature to reject the call. Faced with the refusal, Bukele called for popular insurrection, asking people to gather outside the Assembly to pressure the Assembly for the approval of the extraordinary loan. The Army publicly pledged allegiance to him and showed its willingness to follow his orders. The Armed Forces occupied the streets adjacent to the Assembly and eventually the entire legislative precinct. This constituted a violation of the secular state and a democratic setback.

That same day, accompanied by only 28 of the 84 deputies, Bukele took the Assembly surrounded by soldiers and police, violating the legislative security apparatus. He sat in the chair of the Legislative Power’s president, rang the gong to open the session, remained silent, covered his face with his hands, began to pray, and invoking a divine legitimacy, said that God had spoken to him and told him to “have patience.”

What Bukele actually did was an attempted coup against the Legislative Assembly by entering it surrounded by soldiers and police, and, ultimately, against democracy, as well as a usurpation of the function of the Legislative’s president. The military takeover of the Assembly was an attack on the democratic rule of separation of powers, which he sought to legitimize religiously through the prayer he made while seated in the seat of the president of the Legislative Power. His only support came from his allied party, the military, and the police. With the military takeover of the Parliament, he demonstrated his refusal to dialogue and his inability to reach agreements with the different political forces represented in the Legislative Assembly.

Numerous social groups condemned the militarization, violent takeover, and desecration of the national legislative space. The opposition called for the intervention of the Organization of American States (OAS) to stop what they labeled as an “attempted coup.” The OAS did not initially make a conclusive statement but later supported Bukele.

Authoritarian management of COVID-19 in El Salvador

He again demonstrated his authoritarian, anti-democratic, and religiously fundamentalist profile during the COVID-19 pandemic. He declared a “state of emergency” without a single reported case of infection. When the number of cases increased, he announced on the national radio and television network that the presidency, in view of the difficult situation, would declare Sunday, May 24, 2020, as the National Day of Prayer “so that God may heal our land and allow us to overcome the pandemic that is hitting the entire world.”

Again, on August 9 of the same year, when the pandemic was at its peak in El Salvador, he declared another National Day of Prayer “to ask God to protect us from this disease and free us from suffering.” When cases began to decrease, he attributed the decline, among other causes, to the national days of prayer he decreed.

Recovering the prophetic figure of Monsignor Romero

In the climate of political-religious fundamentalism prevailing today in El Salvador, I believe it is necessary to recover the prophetic figure and great moral stature of Monsignor Oscar Arnulfo Romero, Archbishop of El Salvador, assassinated by order of Major Roberto D’Aubuisson and canonized by Pope Francis on October 14, 2018. Forty-four years after his assassination, he remains a beacon illuminating the darkness of the present. He is now a symbol of the liberating Christianity that embraced the ethical and evangelical option for the impoverished people and groups of his country. He practiced a critical and active citizenship and advocated that Salvadorans be “the forgers of our history” and not allow external powers to impose their destinies upon them.

Romero was an excellent popular educator who, through the Jocist method of see-judge-act and Paulo Freire’s pedagogy of the oppressed, contributed to the people’s transition from naive and intransitive consciousness to transitive and critical consciousness, from mythical consciousness to historical consciousness and from there to transformative praxis. He is a reference in the fight for justice for believers of different religions and non-believers of different ideologies, as well as for politicians due to his way of understanding and practicing the critical and dialectical relationship between power and citizenship, and for religious leaders because of his correct articulation between faith and politics, without falling into fundamentalism.

Monsignor Romero is a cornerstone in building a culture of peace in El Salvador, Latin America, and the world; a culture of peace that is not the absence of conflict or limited to the absence of war, but must be accompanied by work for equality in all areas, as long as it does not result in uniformity, and respect for all types of differences, as long as they do not result in inequality.

Romero did not comfortably settle into the established (dis)order, nor did he condone structural sin, nor did he make peace with the government, as John Paul II asked him to do. He embodied utopia in his life, his message, and his liberating practice, not as an unattainable and phantasmagoric ideal but according to the two moments that characterize it: the denunciation of the oppressive powers of the popular majorities and the proposal of alternatives.

The best expression of Monsignor Romero’s commitment to utopia was his response to a journalist’s question about whether he was afraid of being killed: “If they kill me, I will rise again in the people.”

The best expression of Monsignor Romero’s commitment to utopia was his response to a journalist’s question about whether he was afraid of being killed: “If they kill me, I will rise again in the people.” He was not talking about the resurrection of the dead or eternal life. He was referring to the new life of the Salvadoran people, liberated from structural violence, war, injustice, and poverty.

Another lesson Monsignor Romero teaches us and invites us to practice in times of supremacism like the ones we are living in is his anti-imperialist attitude. He confronted the American Empire in a letter addressed to its president, Jimmy Carter, in which he opposed US economic and military aid to the Government of El Salvador because, in his view, it constituted an unacceptable interference in the destiny of his country and reinforced injustice and repression against the people.

Spirituality is a constitutive dimension of the human being, as is sociability. Today, Monsignor Romero is an example of liberating spirituality. He was a spiritual person, without falling into spiritualism; a mystic, without falling into the mysticism that evades reality; a deeply religious person, but not with a piety unrelated to social conflicts but one immersed in them.

[1] Cyrus was the Persian king who liberated Israel from Babylonian domination.

Religión Digital: https://www.religiondigital.org/el_blog_de_juan_jose_tamayo/Nayib-Bukele-rehen-fundamentalismo-evangelico-salvador_7_2640105965.html

Nayib Bukele, rehén del fundamentalismo evangélico

En dicho encuentro, Bukele expuso su testimonio sobre el apoyo que recibió de Dios en su acceso a la presidencia del país. Contó cómo el Espíritu Santo anunció a unos pastores evangélicos antes de las elecciones que él sería presidente de El Salvador

Bukele tomó la Asamblea rodeado de militares y policías, violando el dispositivo de seguridad legislativa. Se sentó en la silla del presidente del Poder Legislativo, hizo sonar el gong para abrir la sesión, se quedó en silencio, se cubrió el rostro con las manos, se puso a orar y, haciendo apelación a una legitimidad divina, dijo que Dios le había hablado y le había dicho que “tuviera paciencia”.

Nayib Bukele acaba de conseguir la presidencia de la República de El Salvador por segunda vez. Y lo ha hecho en unas elecciones fraudulentas ya que la Constitución salvadoreña prohíbe la reelección. El artículo 154 establece que “el período presidencial será de cinco años y comenzará y terminará el día primero de junio, sin que la persona que haya ejercido la Presidencia pueda continuar en sus funciones ni un día más”. El artículo 248 es contundente al afirmar que “no podrán reformarse en ningún caso los artículos de esta Constitución que se refieren a la forma y sistema de Gobierno, al territorio de la República y a la alternabilidad en el ejercicio de la Presidencia de la República”. Por si hubiera alguna duda sobre la no continuidad del Presidente, según el artículo 75, “pierden los derechos de ciudadano los que suscriban actas, proclamas o adhesiones para promover o apoyar la reelección o la continuación del Presidente de la República, o empleen medios directos encaminados a ese fin”. Según este artículo, promoviendo su reelección y presentándose a ella, es el propio Bukele el que pierde sus derechos de ciudadanía.

En esta artículo voy a centrarme en la alianza del Bukele con los sectores evangélicos fundamentalistas, de los que es rehén. Son ellos quienes legitiman religiosamente su política represiva, autoritaria y, a la postre, antidemocrática, desde que asumió la presidencia por primera vez en 2019. En diciembre de 2018, en vísperas del cierre de la campaña electoral a la presidencia de la República salvadoreña, el candidato Bukele se comprometió ante un grupo de pastores evangélicos a crear una Secretaría de Valores en sintonía con la educación moral que ellos impartían en sus iglesias. En su toma de posesión como presidente de la República, el 1 de junio de 2019, invitó a dirigir una oración al pastor evangélico argentino Dante Gebel, ministro de las Asambleas de Dios, pastor de River Church de Anaheim (California) y cantante en estadios abiertos donde ha conseguido reunir a 100.000 personas

Años antes de ser presidente, Bukele recibió la visita de Franklin Cerrato, pastor evangélico para la diáspora salvadoreña en Estados Unidos, con quien desde entonces mantiene una estrecha relación.  El 23 de julio de 2019, Cerrato organizó un encuentro de líderes evangélicos de la diáspora, del Movimiento Pastores por El Salvador y de la Latino Coalition for Israel con Bukele, ya como presidente de la República, en el hotel Crowne Plaza de San Salvador, donde presentó una propuesta de Iglesia para la nación y un plan de trabajo conjunto para “recuperar los valores y principios para la familia”. En dicho encuentro, Bukele expuso su testimonio sobre el apoyo que recibió de Dios en su acceso a la presidencia del país. Contó cómo el Espíritu Santo anunció a unos pastores evangélicos antes de las elecciones que él sería presidente de El Salvador.

El ‘anuncio’ de Dios

En 2012 había ganado las elecciones a la alcaldía de San Salvador. Su intención era volver a sus empresas una vez terminada su gestión en la alcaldía. Pero sus planes cambiaron cuando un grupo de pastores de distintos países se presentó en su despacho para informarle de lo que Dios les había comunicado: que sería presidente de la República y después tendría otro cargo que no le revelarían.

En citado encuentro del 23 de julio estuvo presente Mario Bramnick, pastor asesor de Donald Trump, cuya misión era defender a Israel y convencer a los líderes latinoamericanos para que trasladaran sus embajadas en Israel a Jerusalén. El pastor anunció allí el final del cautiverio de El Salvador y de toda América Latina y declaró a Bukele libertador de su país: “Estamos en una etapa de cumplimiento de la profecía de los 70 -dijo-. El tiempo del cautiverio se acabó, el Señor está levantando Ciros no solo en Estados Unidos, sino en Latinoamérica. Bolsonaro es un Ciro, su presidente Bukele es un Ciro para este tiempo. Dios está sobre él”[1].

Bramnick reconoció estar en un tiempo “muy sobrenatural” y presumió de que, gracias a la intervención divina y al lobby de la Oficina de la Fe de la Casa Blanca, el presidente de Guatemala, Jimmy Morales, ya había trasladado a Jerusalén su embajada en Israel. La vinculación de Bukele con pastores ultraconservadores no se limita a encuentros puntuales, son relaciones sostenidas por redes cercanas a Bramnick, con fuertes lazos políticos con gobiernos de derecha y una expresa oposición al matrimonio homosexual y al aborto, propuestas fundamentales de la agenda moral de los pastores evangélicos, que coinciden con las de la Iglesia católica.

Otros personajes políticos de la derecha salvadoreña han reforzado la tendencia presidencial hacia el fundamentalismo. La diputada del Partido Conciliación Nacional, Eileen Romero, presentó en noviembre de 2019 en la Asamblea Legislativa una moción para decretar la lectura obligatoria de la Biblia en las escuelas. También en noviembre de 2019, la Junta Directiva de la Asamblea Legislativa otorgó un espacio en la agenda oficial para que un grupo de diez pastores evangélicos entrara a orar por los diputados y las diputadas para que “Dios los ilumine” a la hora de legislar sobre los grandes temas del país.

Oraciones para legitimar el autogolpe

Desde su elección como presidente de la República de El Salvador, en junio de 2019, Nayib Bukele viene dando numerosas muestras de autoritarismo y autocracia, que llegaron a su zenit con el autogolpe de Estado en febrero de 2020. El 9 de febrero de ese año convocó por vía de urgencia a la Asamblea Legislativa para aprobar un crédito de 109 millones de dólares para su plan de seguridad pública, denominado Control Territorial, que había sido impugnado anteriormente por fallos de tipo constitucional. Esta situación llevó a la parte opositora de la Legislatura a rechazar la convocatoria. Ante la negativa, Bukele hizo un llamamiento a la insurrección popular pidiendo a la gente que acudiera al exterior de la Asamblea para presionarla por la aprobación del crédito extraordinario. El Ejército le prestó públicamente lealtad y le mostró su disposición a cumplir sus órdenes. Las Fuerzas Armadas ocuparon las calles adyacentes a la Asamblea y finalmente todo el recinto legislativo. Se trataba de una violación del Estado laico y de un retroceso democrático.

Ese mismo día, con la sola asistencia de 28 de los 84 diputados, Bukele tomó la Asamblea rodeado de militares y policías, violando el dispositivo de seguridad legislativa. Se sentó en la silla del presidente del Poder Legislativo, hizo sonar el gong para abrir la sesión, se quedó en silencio, se cubrió el rostro con las manos, se puso a orar y, haciendo apelación a una legitimidad divina, dijo que Dios le había hablado y le había dicho que “tuviera paciencia”.

Lo que hizo Bukele en realidad fue un intento de golpe contra la Asamblea Legislativa al entrar en ella rodeado de militares y policías y, a la postre, contra la democracia, así como una usurpación de la función del presidente del Legislativo. La toma militar de la Asamblea fue un atentado contra la regla democrática de separación de poderes, que pretendió legitimar religiosamente a través de la oración que hizo sentado en la sede del presidente del Poder Legislativo. Los únicos apoyos con los que contó fueron su partido aliado, el ejército y la policía. Con la toma militar del Parlamento demostró su negativa al diálogo y su incapacidad para llegar a acuerdos con las diferentes fuerzas políticas representadas en la Asamblea Legislativa. 

Numerosos colectivos sociales condenaron la militarización, la toma violenta y la profanación del espacio legislativo nacional. La oposición reclamó la intervención de la Organización de Estados Americanos (OEA) para frenar lo que calificó de “autogolpe de Estado”. La OEA no se pronunció al principio de manera concluyente, pero días después respaldó a Bukele.

Gestión autoritaria de covid-19 en El Salvador

Volvió a demostrar su perfil autoritario, antidemocrático y religiosamente fundamentalista durante la pandemia de la covid-19. Declaró “Estado de Excepción” sin que se hubiera producido un solo caso de contagio. Cuando los casos de contagio aumentaron, anunció en la cadena nacional de radio y televisión que la presidencia, en vista de la difícil situación, decretaría el domingo 24 de mayo de 2020 como Día Nacional de la Oración “para que Dios sane nuestra tierra y nos permita vencer la pandemia que está golpeando al mundo entero”.

Nuevamente, el 9 de agosto del mismo año, cuando la pandemia estaba en su mayor escalada en El Salvador, decretó otro Día Nacional de la Oración “para pedir a Dios que nos proteja de esta enfermedad y nos libre de sufrimiento”. Cuando los casos comenzaron a bajar, atribuyó el descenso, entre otras causas, a los días nacionales de la oración decretados por él.

Recuperar la figura profética de monseñor Romero

En el clima de integrismo político-religioso reinante hoy en El Salvador, creo necesario recuperar la figura profética y de gran talla moral de Monseñor Óscar Arnulfo Romero, arzobispo de El Salvador, asesinado por orden del Mayor Roberto D’Aubuisson y canonizado por el papa Francisco el 14 de octubre de 2018. Cuarenta y cuatro años después de su asesinato sigue siendo faro que ilumina la oscuridad del presente. Él es hoy un símbolo del cristianismo liberador que asumió la opción ética y evangélica por las personas y los colectivos empobrecidos de su país. Ejerció una ciudadanía crítica y activa y defendió que fueran los propios salvadores “los forjadores de nuestra historia” y no permitieran que poderes exteriores les impusieran el destino a seguir.

Romero fue un excelente pedagogo popular que, a través del método jocista del ver-juzgar-actuar y de la pedagogía del oprimido de Paulo Freire, contribuyó a que el pueblo pasara de la conciencia ingenua e intransitiva a la conciencia transitiva y crítica, de la conciencia mítica a la conciencia histórica y de esta a la praxis transformadora. Constituye un referente en la lucha por la justicia para creyentes de las diferentes religiones y para no creyentes de distintas ideología, así como para los políticos por su manera de entender y practicar la relación crítica y dialéctica entre poder y ciudadanía, y para los dirigentes religiosos por su correcta articulación entre fe y política, sin caer en el fundamentalismo.

Monseñor Romero es piedra angular en la construcción de la cultura de paz en El Salvador, en América Latina y en todo el mundo; cultura de paz que no es la ausencia de conflictos ni se limita a la ausencia de guerra, sino que ha de ir acompañada del trabajo por la igualdad en todos los ámbitos, siempre que no desemboquen en uniformidad, y del respeto a las diferencias de todo tipo, siempre que no desemboquen en desigualdad.

Romero no se instaló cómodamente en el (des)orden establecido, ni consintió con el pecado estructural, ni hizo las paces con el gobierno, como le pedía Juan Pablo II. Encarnó la utopía en su vida, su mensaje y su práctica liberadora, no como ideal irrealizable y fantasmagórico, sino conforme a los dos momentos que la caracterizan: la denuncia de los poderes que oprimían a las mayorías populares y la propuesta de alternativas.

La mejor expresión del compromiso de monseñor Romero con la utopía fue la respuesta que dio a la pregunta de un periodista sobre si tenía miedo a que lo mataran: “Si me matan, resucitaré en el pueblo”

La mejor expresión del compromiso de monseñor Romero con la utopía fue la respuesta que dio a la pregunta de un periodista sobre si tenía miedo a que lo mataran: “Si me matan, resucitaré en el pueblo”. No estaba hablando de la resurrección de los muertos, ni de la vida eterna. Se refería a la nueva vida del pueblo salvadoreño, liberado de la violencia estructural, la guerra, la injusticia y la pobreza.

Otra lección que nos enseña monseñor Romero y que nos invita a practicar en tiempos de supremacismo como los que estamos viviendo es su actitud anti-imperialista. Él se enfrentó al Imperio estadounidense en una carta dirigida a su presidente, Jimmy Carter, en la que se oponía a la ayuda económica y militar de Estados Unidos al Gobierno de El Salvador, porque, a su juicio, constituía una injerencia inaceptable en los destinos de su país y reforzaba la injusticia y la represión contra el pueblo.    

La espiritualidad es una dimensión constitutiva del ser humano, como lo es la sociabilidad. Monseñor Romero es hoy un ejemplo de espiritualidad liberadora. Él fue una persona espiritual, sin caer en el espiritualismo; un místico sin caer en el misticismo evasivo de la realidad; una persona profundamente religiosa, pero no con una piedad ajena a los conflictos sociales, sino inmersa en ellos.

[1] Ciro fue el rey persa que liberó a Israel de la dominación de Babilonia.

Religión Digital: https://www.religiondigital.org/el_blog_de_juan_jose_tamayo/Nayib-Bukele-rehen-fundamentalismo-evangelico-salvador_7_2640105965.html